No Easy Way: The story of Ted Williams and the last .400 season by Fred Bowen

No Easy WayWe live in a 30 second world. Today people IM because it takes too long to talk. They “tweet” to inform us of their every thought and movement. “News” is available on TV or online—even on our phones!–24 hours a day. Everything happens fast; yesterday’s news is ancient history. Kids may not believe it but, it wasn’t always that way.

In the “olden days”, rewards were earned. You had to wait. You had to have patience. “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” In No Easy Way, Fred Bowen illustrates this point perfectly.

Bowen uses a chatty, easy going tone to stress over and over again how Boston Red Sox great, Ted Williams, knew from childhood that the only way to get really good at hitting was to practice. Williams’ love of baseball got him to the field but practice got him into the record books. There was no instant gratification for Ted. He played and practiced every chance he got. He practiced alone, on pickup teams, school teams and all the way up to the major leagues. It’s a thrilling story made all the more so because it’s true. Young baseball fans—or anyone trying to master a skill–will love it. Ted Williams proved that dreams can come true.

Well matched to Bowen’s prose, the illustrations of Charles Pyle, along with a few photographs, firmly place the story in the past, in a time different from our own. The tale, however, is timeless and just right for today’s hurried lifestyle. Using Williams’ career and record as a springboard, Bowen, “hits a home run” spotlighting how hard work, determination and practice, practice, practice will always stand the test of time.

Posted by: Eileen

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